Tuesday, July 14, 2009

Tabbouleh


I know this isn't the most innovative salad, and in fact is really not innovative at all. But it was super delicious and I haven't participated in No Croutons Required (a monthly soup/salad blog event) for a while, so I'm submitting this! This month's theme is soup/salad with grains. I wanted to include this salad in my mom's birthday meal since I know she's been wanting to find a good tabbouleh recipe for a while. I remember she tried one out but no one really liked it that much - I think because of the mint. So I skipped the mint in this one, and we all loved it. Even my stepdad, who said he always says no to tabbouleh, had a second helping. For those interested, my mom's birthday meal included this tabbouleh, insanely delicious focaccia (which is kind of fried while baking mmm, more on that in another post), olive tapenade, broccoli lemon feta pecan pasta, roasted vegetables, and lemon lust cake.


I don't feel the need to search for a better or different tabbouleh and will definitely make this again. I would love to try adding the suggested additions to make it more of a substantial meal salad - chickpeas, roasted red peppers, cucumbers, olives. Bulghur isn't available at the grocery stores near me, so I have to get it from a warehouse/specialty food store that's about 30 minutes away. My boyfriend was in the area one day (while I was at home) and he called me to tell me he was at that store. A store I think he doesn't really enjoy going to when I'm with him because I say I just need to pick up 2 or 3 things and then get lost looking at all the different kinds of grains, beans, dried fruit, etc. He went to search for the bulghur because he knew I'd been wanting it. How sweet is he? Oh and did I mention that he did all of the chopping for this salad?

If this sounds good, you might also like:
Bulghur Grape Salad
French Barley Salad
Santa Fe Pasta Salad
Balkan Roasted Vegetable Salad

Tabbouleh
Adapted from Rebar: Modern Food Cookbook

1 cup bulghur
1 1/4 cups boiling water
1/2 tsp salt
1/4 cup extra virgin olive oil
1/4 cup lemon juice
2 garlic cloves, minced
3/4 tsp salt
1/4 tsp ground cumin
1/4 tsp hot sauce
1/2 tsp cracked pepper
1 bunch parsley
1/2 small red onion (Ashley note: The recipe recommended using 1 small onion but I thought it'd be too much so only used half. But the salad can definitely handle 1 small red onion so it's up to you.)

1. Combine bulghur and salt in a bowl and stir in the boiling water. Cover tightly with plastic wrap for 20 minutes. (Ashley note: Mine took longer than 20 minutes - maybe 30-35.) Uncover and fluff the grains with a fork. Let cool to room temperature.

2. Meanwhile, make the dressing by whisking together olive oil, lemon juice, garlic and seasonings. Set aside.

3. Wash stemmed parsley, shake off excess water and dry on a clean kitchen towel. Mince the parsley and red onion. In a serving bowl, combine cooled bulghur, prepared parsley and onion. Pour dressing over the ingredients and toss thoroughly. Let the salad rest before serving (30 minutes), or cover and store in the refrigerator.

21 comments:

Luana said...

I make this with green onions, but I love the way the red onion looks in yours. I'll have to try that next time. Thanks!

Talita said...

Tabbouleh is delicious! I think it's so tasteful!

veggievixen said...

i love tabbouleh! my family always had these box mixes that came with the bulgur & spices, but i love making it from scratch now. i really like that yours has red onion-yum!

Jacqueline said...

That looks really tasty Ashley, in fact the whole meal sounded great. Just what I would enjoy.

Thanks for submitting it :)

Pam said...

I love tabbouleh but have never made it...thanks for the inspiration and recipe!

Dana said...

I love tabbouleh too! I've used Deborah Madison's recipes in the past but they have never seemed quite right. I'll try this one next time. It looks like a good balance of grains to parsley. Sometimes I feel like they are parsley salad with a bit of bulghur.

Lisa said...

That sounds wonderful. Thanks so much for submitting this. I rarely eat tabbouleh, but I would certainly enjoy this. Love the birthday menu too!

kickpleat said...

Mmmm, I really do love tabbouleh. I've never tried the rebar version (as I always stick to the Moosewood one). I'll give this a try!

Grace said...

i just love tabbouleh, but i've always seen it made with tomatoes. your version's great--it sounds perfectly refreshing and has no need for tomatoes. :)

CookiePie said...

Beautiful - LOVE this!

Maria said...

Great recipe! We love this stuff!

Hannah said...

Oh but I love tabbouleh! You know what they say- If it's not broken, don't fix it. ;)

Johanna said...

I love tabbouleh - can highly recommend trying it with freshly diced tomatoes - would love to try it with chickpeas! And I know what you mean about going to a shop for 2 or 3 things - I am hopeless!

Liz said...

I love it, this salad is wondeful! and with red onions... must be tastier and prettier! I wanted to ask you if it's okay to add your blog to my blogroll. If there is no problem, let me know and I will publish it asap. Bye!

The Duo Dishes said...

Oh, we love mint in any pasta or grain dish. This is one to try...mint included!

Helene said...

Tabbouleh is one of my favorite salad. It's even good in wraps.

Deborah said...

I've actually never had tabbouleh, so I really want to try this!

Clare and Gary said...

That looks great and we shall be trying, I'm also curious about your broccoli lemon feta pecan pasta...have you posted this..I lokoed but could not find and it sounds delicious!

Melle Marion said...

I love such disches in summer!
(sorry for my english but I'm french, actually I don't speak very well ^^ )

Steph said...

I love your cooking dishes because they usually have ingredients I've never tried, but always wanted too. He did such a great job at chopping, all those pieces are so tiny and uniform. When I cut onions, I usually get some abnormally large pieces.

Anonymous said...

I read a article under the same title some time ago, but this articles quality is much, much better. How you do this?